Fri, 04/28/2017 - 06:19

Posted by Belinda Alzner on March 14, 2012

"Freedom of the press is the necessary condition for maintenance and enjoyment of the other freedoms." 

That was a statement spoke by Marlys Edwardh, the lawyer who represented Maher Arar, during a panel discussion at a Ryerson University conference that delved into issues surrounding press freedom in Canada last week. The standing-room-only classroom of students, teachers and industry members seemed to silently nod in unison.

If such a notion receives such unanimous agreeance, then why do we even need to talk about it? If it's that obvious, surely a developed country such as Canada is an exemplary case for press freedom.

But as Ivor Shapiro noted in a column for J-Source, while Canada may not kill its reporters, there are still significant restrictions on press freedom, and Canadians at large simply don't give a damn. 

Some of these issues were discussed at Ryerson's Press Freedom in Canada conference. Topics ranged from a slew of issues in the courts -- from clerks, to juries, to technology in the courtroom -- to ethics codes, professional distinction, access to information, liability and intimidation. J-Source's Belinda Alzner and Rhiannon Russell were there covering each panel live (as you may have noticed from last week's newsfeed barrage if you follow J-Source on Twitter.)

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They have pared down the information into two summaries that highlight each of the panel discussions. Click on the images below to go to the summary for the respective day. 

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Comments

What a great summary, thanks. I think press freedom is essential to democracies, but cannot happen if we have a lot of public apathy.

 

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J-Source and ProjetJ are publications of the Canadian Journalism Project, a venture among post-secondary journalism schools and programs across Canada, led by Ryerson University, Université Laval and Carleton University and supported by a group of donors.